Faculty Staff

 

 

Professor Andy Baker
BSc Bristol, PhD Bristol

Research Interests
Andy's research interests include karst hydrology and geochemistry; the paleoclimate reconstructions from cave stalagmites; isotope geochemistry; the characterisation of organic matter in rivers, ground waters and engineered systems, including potable and recycled water; and surface and ground water quality monitoring. 

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Associate Professor Bryce Kelly
BSc(Hons) UNSW, PhD UNSW

Research Interests

Associate Professor Bryce Kelly has over 30 years of international lecturing, consulting and research experience in hydrogeology, computational geology, geostatistics and greenhouse gas measurements. From 1995 to 2002 he was joint developer of the EarthVision geostatistics package (www.dgi.com), before moving back into education and research. From 2005 to 2012 he was director of groundwater research for the Cotton Catchment Communities CRC, and from 2009 to 2014 he was a chief investigator with the National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training (NCGRT). Bryce does extensive outreach to inform government policy development and the community. As part of his science outreach he has written popular press articles including pieces for The Conversation and Australian Geographic.  His current groundwater research focuses on measuring the impact of agriculture, mining and coal seam gas on groundwater resources. Bryce is presently also applying his geological knowledge and computational skills to the ongoing development of a comprehensive 3D geological modelling environment called Crystallize. As an extension to the Crystallize package he is advancing the application of artificial intelligence methods for forecasting the change in the groundwater level due to groundwater withdrawals and climate variability.  .


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Dr Hamid Roshan 
BSc, MSc and PhD Petroleum Engineering, UNSW

Research Interests

Hamid’s research interests centre on the experimental and numerical multi-physics modelling of reactive porous media in particular shales at both micro and macro scales. The area extends from physic-chemical characterization to experimental design and constitutive modelling under chemical, thermal, hydraulic and mechanical interactions with a wide range of applications from unconventional resources to environmental topics. Hamid was a Petroleum Engineer before joining the academia where he worked on geological modelling and formation evaluation within several geomechanical projects.

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Helen Rutlidge 

Dr Helen Rutlidge

After completing her PhD in Analytical Chemistry at UTS, Sydney in 2011, Helen started working at the Analytical Centre at UNSW, Sydney. During this time she developed laser ablation ICP-MS methods for a wide range of samples and was part of inter-disciplinary collaboration investigating artificial irrigations in karst environments. She then transitioned into several post-doctoral roles focussing on geochemistry and organic matter processes at UNSW, Sydney. This included working on projects to inform the assessment of ecohydrological responses to coal seam gas extraction and coal mining, and investigating groundwater organic carbon and whether it is a carbon source or sink.

Research Interests

Helen's research focuses on geochemistry of surface water and groundwater interactions, natural organic matter characterisation, stable water isotope hydrology and cave and karst water quality processes. 

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Dr John Triantafilis
BScAgr, PhD USyd

John is a soil scientist with a Bachelor of Science (BSCAgr, 1991) and Doctor of Philosophy (Agriculture, 1996). He has 24 years’ experience in the application of proximal soil sensors to develop digital soil maps at the field, farm and district level. He specialises in the use of electromagnetic induction instruments and more recently the application of gamma-ray spectrometry measurements. 

At the present time he is funded by the Australian Federal Government Cotton Research and Development Corporation (CRDC) to develop methods to measure and monitor soil moisture status beneath irrigated cotton growing crops during wetting and drying phases. As part of this project he is also developing techniques to develop three-dimensional spatial models of the distribution of salinity and clay content to 12 m.

He is also funded by the Australian Federal Governments Sugar Research Australia (SRA) through a grant which aims to use proximal soil sensors to develop digital soil maps of either soil properties or soil type. The results will be used to guide sugarcane farmers to in the development of Precision Agriculture methods to drive gains in productivity by more strategically applying fertilisers and ameliorants.

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 Dr Tariro Mutongwizo

Tariro is a Postdoctoral Fellow at UNSW Law, she is currently working on the Discovery Project: Non-urban water governance: rethinking compliance and enforcement (DP190101584) with Professor Cameron Holley. Her research interests include multidisciplinary approaches to exploring the non-state governance of security, the governance of contested spaces and the security of vulnerable and marginalized groups. She has published on the intersection between state and non-state actors in the governance of security in Africa and Australia. Her current research focuses on comparative approaches on the governance and management of water resources globally.

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 Cameron Holley

Dr Cameron Holley
BSc (Env)/LLB (1st Hons) Griffith University; Grad Dip in PLEAT University of Queensland; PhD The Australian National University

Research Interests
Cameron is a Professor at UNSW Law and publishes widely in the areas of environmental law, natural resources law, energy law and water law, with a focus on regulation, governance and groundwater. An empirical researcher, Cameron has worked closely with Australian and international government and non-government organisations on a range of water management research projects. His current research agenda is centred on water law and energy governance, including unconventional gas, renewable energy, compliance and enforcement and monitoring of groundwater use. 

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Dr Matthew Kearnes

BSc (Hons) Macquarie University; PhD University of Newcastle. 

Research Interests

Matthew is a member of the Environment and Society group, based in the School of Humanities and Languages, UNSW. 

Before arriving at UNSW, Matthew held post-doctoral positions at the Department of Geography at the Open University and the Department of Sociology at Lancaster University. Matthew also held a Research Council’s UK Academic Fellowship at the Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Department of Geography, Durham University (2007-2011).

Matthew's research is situated between the fields of Science and Technology Studies (STS), social and cultural geography and contemporary social theory. His research focuses on the social constitution of processes of technological and environmental change. In this context, Matthew has documented the constitution of vernacular understandings of, and responses to, technological, scientific and environmental change, and has explored novel means for promoting diverse forms public participation. Deploying qualitative and ethnographic methodologies, Matthew's research has explored the societal dimensions of, and public engagement with, climatic change, bio-nanotechnology, geoengineering and contemporary water treatment and supply.

Matthew is a CI in the ARC Centre of Excellence on Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology (2014-2021), and a CI on the ARC Discovery Project Designing illicit drug policy solutions: the role of participation (DP200100909, with Prof. Alison Ritter, Dr. Kari Lancaster & Prof. Jason Chilvers).  Matthew held an ARC Future Fellowship between 2014-2018. Matthew is also currently a fellow of the PLuS Alliance, and a member of the leadership team of the UNSW Global Water Institute

Matthew is an associate editor of Science as Culture. He is a member of the Society for Social Studies of Science (4S), the European Association for the Study of Science and Technology (EASST), the Science and Democracy Network and the Asia-Pacific Science, Technology and Society Network.

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