Integrated Groundwater Management: Concepts, Approaches and Challenges

Posted 5 September 2016

Contributions from the CWI team feature in a new open access book that is among the first to cover hydrogeology, sustainable development, water policy, governance, and management.

Entitled Integrated Groundwater Management: Concepts, Approaches and Challenges (edited by Anthony J. Jakeman, Olivier Barreteau, Randall J. Hunt, Jean-Daniel Rinaudo and Andrew Ross), the book was recently published by Springer.

Initially conceived by the National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training, the work addresses a substantial gap in the literature on the interdisciplinary aspects of addressing groundwater-related issues.

It encompasses the global scope of current work in these areas, with contributions from 74 world-leading authors, including three from the Connected Waters Initiative Research Centre at UNSW:

Given the formidable challenges posed by groundwater management, the book covers both theory and principles, including: 1) an overview of the dimensions and requirements of groundwater management from an international perspective; 2) the scale of groundwater issues internationally and its links with other sectors, principally energy and climate change; 3) groundwater governance with regard to principles, instruments and institutions available for integrated groundwater management;  4) biophysical constraints and the capacity and role of hydroecological and hydrogeological science including water quality concerns; and 5) necessary tools including models, data infrastructures, decision support systems and the management of uncertainty.

The chapters and the book are available for free here: http://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783319235752

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