Emeritus Professor Ian Acworth opens the Water Bar in old Paddington Reservoir

Posted 25 February 2016

A water bar constructed by Sydney-based artist Janet Laurence has been opened in the old Paddington Reservoir in Sydney.

The bar is a part of the Art and About program organised by the Sydney City. The program will run until the end of February and is easily accessible on Oxford Street.

Janet’s interest is in the origin of the many different types of water that are available these days. If you have time to drop in – it is worth it. Taste the difference between rainwater collected at Mount Grim on the northwest of Tasmania and spring water from the Sydney region or indeed, Sydney water from the various reservoirs operated by Sydney Water. All taste different!

Janet wanted someone to open the Water Bar who could talk a little about the various processes impacting the taste of water. She asked Emeritus Prof. Ian Acworth to conduct the opening along with Sydney Lord Mayor - Clover Moore.

Ian spoke briefly about the various sources of water, that all spring water is groundwater and how important that incredibly thin zone of active water is to our survival. The transcript of his speech can be downloaded here.

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