CWI at 39th IAH Congress

Posted 26 September 2012

Left to right: Andy Baker, Monika Markowska, Ian Acworth, Wendy Timms, Helen Rutlidge and Denis O'Carroll.

With over 900 delegates, this was the largest and probably most successful IAH congress ever.

Presentations were given within the Aquitards session by Wendy Timms on the latest results from the NCGRT centrifuge permeameter, and the use of biomarkers in aquitard research. Wendy was also co-convenor of this session.

Within the Karst Hydrogeology sessions Andy Baker presented the latest results from the Wellington GEIF site, reporting infiltration characteristics in semi-arid karst environments. He also presented new results that use the properties of laminated stalagmites in determining karst hydrological properties.

In the Surface Water - Groundwater sessions, Ian Acworth presented results from the Namoi GEIF site demonstrating the effect of tree water use on surface waters, and in the aquitards session, a demonstration on how cross-hole seismicity could be used to derive aquifer storage parameters.

In the poster session, Monika Markoswka (ANSTO and CWI) presented results from her honours thesis investigating heat as a tracer in karst infiltration waters, and Andy Baker presented a summary poster of his recent research into modelling infiltration water oxygen isotopes. CWI Affiliate Dioni Cendón (ANSTO) presented his recent results synthesising the radiocarbon age of Australian groundwaters, as well as his recent research improving conceptual models using radiometric age data in collaborating with Matt Currell at RMIT.

Also attending the Congress was NCGRT postdoc Helen Rutlidge and well as several CWI collaborators, most notably our NCGRT Partner Investigators from Geoscience Australia, who reported diverse research findings over more than ten presentations. The CWI team also met up with UNSW Water Research Laboratory projects engineers past and present Doug Anderson and Alexandra Badenhop, and recent CWI member Denis O'Carroll.

Outside the sessions, Andy Baker and Dioni Cendon attended the Groundwater: Global Paleoclimate Signals (G@GPS) meeting, Monika Markoswka attended the pre-conference isotopes training course, and Andy and Wendy liaised with NCGRT colleagues Laki Kondylas and Fiona Adamson on the NCGRT stand, and with planning for the 2013 IAH Congress . IAH 2013 will be in Perth in September. We hope to see you there!

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