American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting 2015

Posted 18 December 2015

Gurinder Nagra was the successful recipient of the 2015 David E. Lumley Young Scientist Scholarship for Energy and Environmental Science

CWI was well represented at the world's largest earth and space science conference in held San Francisco in December 2015.

CWI research featured at the 2015 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting in San Fransisco From December 14-18. With more than 24,000 attendees, the AGU Fall Meeting is the largest conference of its kind world-wide.

This year, the CWI team presented at the session The Karst Record in Water Limited Environments, convened by CWI Affiliate Dr Pauline Treble (ANSTO) and Prof. Andy Baker, with colleagues from UC Irvine and the University of Texas at Austin.

Oral presentations were given by Katie Coleborn on Wildfire on Karst: an overview and Monika Markowska on Cave monitoring to determine the controls on d18O from a modern speleothem record I semi-arid SE Australia. The PhD research of Dr Kashif Mahmud, Flow classification and cave discharge characteristics in unsaturated karst formations was presented by CWI alumnus Dr Gregoire Mariethoz (University of Lausanne). Click here for the presentation abstracts.

Poster presentations were given by Prof. Andy Baker (Hundreds of automatic drip counters reveal infiltration water discharge characteristics in Australian caves), and Dr Pauline Treble (Roles of transpiration, forest bioproductivity and fire on a long-term dripwater hydrochemistry dataset from Golgotha Cave, SW Australia). Poster presentations were also given by BEES and CWI honours researchers Ingrid Flemons (The fire distinguisher: a baseline study of semi-arid karst dripwater in Wildman’s Cave at Wombeyan, NSW Australia), Gurinder Nagra (Igniting the secret wildfires of the past: searching for wildfire records in caves to unravel hidden paleo-fire records) and Amethyst Lupingna (Fire, water and the Earth below: quantifying the geochemical signature of fire in infiltration water and their impacts on underlying karst systems).  Click here for the poster abstracts.

Gurinder Nagra was the successful recipient of the 2015 David E. Lumley Young Scientist Scholarship for Energy and Environmental Science. This AGU scholarship targets high school and undergraduate students. Its purpose is to inspire today’s young minds to work on problems of global importance in both the energy and environmental sectors of industry and academia.

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