Dioni Cendón from ANSTO joins the CWI team

Posted 19 December 2011

Dioni Cendón conducting fieldwork

Hydrogeochemist Dioni Cendón loves the least abundant parts of water, small traces of interactions with rocks or living things that can be used to follow their path in the hydrological cycle.

Already an adjunct member of the UNSW School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences (BEES) at UNSW, Dioni has now joined the CWI research centre, which spans research in Science and Engineering.

Usually, Dioni can be found within the Institute for Environmental Research at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), where he is a task leader for 'Isotopes in the hydrological cycle', a research program at ANSTO designed to investigate ground and surface water connection, and the residence times of groundwater. This research utilises a number of key facilities available at ANSTO, especially the use of the Accelerator mass spectrometers for the analysis of 14C in dissolved inorganic and organic carbon within groundwater.

Dioni's research interests include the groundwater resources of arid, tropical, and humid landscapes, novel application of hydrochemical tracers, and the evolution of modern and ancient evaporite basins.

This breadth of interests and range of skills, especially in analytical chemistry, will complement the already large range of interests within the CWI team, and foster a closer collaboration between researchers at UNSW and ANSTO.

Some recent research publications from Dioni and his team are listed below:
Meredith K.T., Cendón D.I., Pigois J-P., Hollins S.E., Jacobsen G. (2011). Using 14C and 3H to delineate a recharge 'window' into the Perth Basin aquifers, North Gnangara groundwater system, Western Australia. Science of Total Environment, doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2011.10.016.

García-Veigas J., Cendón D.I., Pueyo J.J. and Peryt T. (2011). Zechstein saline brines in Poland, evidence of overturned anoxic ocean during the Late Permian mass extinction event. Chemical Geology 290, 189–201.

Pogson R.E., Osborne R.A.L., Colchester D.M. and Cendón D.I. (2011). Sulfate and phosphate-sulfate speleothemes at Jenolan Caves, New South Wales. Acta Carsologica 40(2), 239-254.

Hughes, C.E., Cendón D.I., Johansen, M.P., and Meredith, K.T., (2011). Climate Change and Groundwater Sustaining Groundwater Resources, in Jones, J.A.A., ed.: International Year of Planet Earth, Springer Netherlands, p. 97-117.

Cendón D.I., Larsen J.R., Jones B.G., Nanson G.C., Rickleman D., Hankin S.I., Pueyo J.J. Maroulis J. (2010). Freshwater recharge into a shallow saline groundwater system, Cooper Creek floodplain, Queensland, Australia. Journal of Hydrology 392, 150-163.

Cartwright I., Weaver T., Cendón D.I., Swane I. (2010). Environmental isotopes as indicators of aquitard effectiveness and inter-aquifer mixing, Wimmera Region, Murray Basin, Southeast Australia. Chemical Geology 277, 214-226.

Hughes, C.E., Cendón D.I., Harrison, J.J., Hankin, S.I., Collins, R.N,. Payne, T.E., Vine, M., Johansen, M.P., Hoffmann, E.L., Loosz, T. (2010) Movement of a tritium plume in shallow groundwater at a legacy low level radioactive waste disposal site in eastern Australia. Journal of Environmental Radioactivity 102, 943-952.

Latest news

Floating though the dolines

Floating though the dolines

24 July 2020

Are you a fan of ABC's Conversations with Richard Fidler? Well, you might want to take a listen to this episode of the program with subterranean ecologist Stefan Eberhard.  

Read more…

New questions over Shenhua water modelling

New questions over Shenhua water modelling

24 July 2020

Take a listen to ABC Radio National Breakfast's segment on the controversial $1.5 billion Shenhua thermal coal mine on the New South Wales Liverpool Plains. Research undertaken by UNSW's leading groundwater expert Professor Ian Acworth indicates that the company's water modelling is flawed.

Read more…

Ban on toxic mercury looms in sugar cane farming, but Australia still has a way to go

Ban on toxic mercury looms in sugar cane farming, but Australia still has a way to go

18 July 2020

CWI's Professors Cameron Holley and Darren Sinclair and Australian National University's Professor Simon Haberle and Larissa Schneider recently contributed to The Conversation, discussing federal authorities announcement of "an upcoming ban on mercury-containing pesticide in Australia", highlighting Australia is "one of the last countries in the world to do so, despite overwhelming evidence over more than 60 years that mercury use as fungicide in agriculture is dangerous." 

Read more…

Ancient water to drain from farmland without ongoing joint management

Ancient water to drain from farmland without ongoing joint management

1 July 2020

The management of withdrawals of ground water in the Central West remains an area of hotly-contested debate. Associate Professor of Hydrogeology Bryce Kelly has spent over a decade studying groundwater in the Central West, and has credited groundwater with “saving rural communities from collapse”, but its potential for future drought-proofing depends on how successfully it’s managed. He says current withdrawals “will only be sustainable if the Narromine region gets flooded frequently enough to balance the volume of groundwater extracted."

Read more…

GWI Global Water Matters Podcast

21 June 2020

The UNSW-GWI Global Water Matters Podcast was launched in 2020 to share interesting and important water-related developments and insights from global experts across the broad spectrum of water-related disciplines. Born from the demand to continue the Water Issues Commentary seminar series under the constraints of social distancing, new episodes are released monthly.

Read more…