GEIF launch at WRL

Posted 28 October 2011

The official opening of the new GEIF headquarters at WRL.

UNSW WRL celebrated the launch of its newest facility, the Groundwater Education Investment Fund (GEIF) headquarters on 7 September 2011.

The star attraction was the new $800,000 geotechnical centrifuge which is one of only two of its kind in the world.

Funded by the Australian Research Council and the National Water Commission, the centrifuge has been described as a time machine, since it allows researchers to preview the long-term effects of groundwater abstraction on aquifers and aquitards.

The official launch of the centrifuge and the GEIF headquarters was attended by a large number of guests from academia and industry, including Ms Clare McLaughlin (General Manager of the Department of Innovation Industry Science and Research); Professor Craig Simmons from the National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training; Professor Graham Davies, Dean of the UNSW Faculty of Engineering, and other affiliated guests from the National Water Commission, NSW Office of Water and the NSW Department of Trade and Investment.

Also in attendance were a large number of guests who had attended the International Association of Hydrologists Symposium held in Sydney earlier in the week.

The launch attracted a Sydney Morning Herald feature article, and the centrifuge's research potential is continuing to attract media interest throughout Australia.

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